Friday, June 21, 2013

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MoSCoW Method for Requirements Prioritization

Dearest Readers,

As we all know, in any Project the Requirements are the key components of Project Scope. The Requirements should be prioritized, so that it will be easy to determine which Requirements are most important and which are least. Though there are different methods to prioritize the Requirements, in this Blog Post we will discuss about the MoSCoW Method for Requirements Prioritization. 

Origination: The MoSCoW approach was originated from the Dynamic Software Development Method (DSDM) Methodology. 

Acronym:  MoSCoW stands for:
  • Must have (or Minimum Usable Subset)
  • Should have
  • Could have
  • Won’t have (but Would like in future)
Note: The o's in MoSCoW are added to make the acronym pronounceable, and are often written in lowercase to depict that they don't have any significance.

MoSCoW is a Requirements Prioritization method that is used to take a decision on which requirements must be completed first and which must come later or will not be completed at all. To understand it practically, I have taken a simple example.

Example: You are planning to buy an SUV (of at least 7 seats) to Travel with your family and friends  on the weekends. The SUV should be of Diesel variant. As Red is your favorite color, you want to have Red color body work on it. Additionally you would like to have Bluetooth connectivity for your iPod. You are fond of having a 4-wheel drive mechanism in the SUV...and so on so forth...

As depicting a BA concept through a "Picture" is the uniqueness of my Blog, again I have come up with the below one which explains the MoSCoW Method in detail and prioritization of the above mentioned requirements in the example using the MoSCoW Methodology.

Pic: MoSCoW Methodology

Hope you will have a clear understanding of the MoSCoW Methodoly from the above picture. 

To deliver a successful project requires prioritization of the Requirements and Project Objectives (Scope, Quality, Time-frame and Resources). The below picture will give you an understanding of how 100% of Total efforts of a Project gets distributed as per the MoSCoW Prioritization Framework.

Pic: Project Effort Distribution - MoSCoW Framework

So with this blog post my objective is to make you all understand the MoSCoW Concept for Requirements Prioritization. Hope you all will like this.

Please do let me know your thoughts, feedback through comments...so that I can improve my blog post presentation for all the Dearest Readers... :)


As We Work...We Learn...

11 comments :

Shankari said...

A very nice post indeed on prioritizing requirements! I knew about 'Must have', 'Should have', etc. but came to know about the 'MoSCoW' term with your post. Thanks for that :)
The simple example of SUV makes this post very easy to understand.

Laxman Rao Koka said...

A good piece of action process and is apt to consider at the time of starting any project. Thank you very much.

amit potar said...

A wonderful method of requirement prioritizing gifted by Agile; have used in 3 of my projects & found more reliable than anything else.

amit potar said...

By the way you have used a very good example to explain it.....!!!!!!

Abhijit Patro said...

Thank you very much everyone for your feedback/complement.

Regards...

Ajanta said...

Very beautifully explained the first thing to keep in mind while gathering requirements...

Abhijit Patro said...

Thanks Ajanta...

Regards...

Prasad Kamath said...

Dear Abhijit,

Thanks for your post. You have used an interesting example. However, though people call MoSCoW a prioritization method, it cannot really be called a prioritization method because there is no method involved in it.

MoSCoW is what the output of prioritization looks like, but it does not provide any method to arrive at Must-have, Should-have and Could-have and hence that is left to personal interpretation.

A prioritization methodology is one that provides a convincing way to arrive at Must-have, Should-have and Could-have, thereby reducing the level of subjectivity in the prioritization, for instance, the Karl Wiegers prioritization method.

Regards

Narayanan oR said...

a very good article with an excellent example

Anonymous said...

Very nice article for understanding MoSCoW framework :)

Anonymous said...

the first picture is not viewable can you repost?

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